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  • Advanced Forensic Art & Interviewing

Every year thousands of eyewitnesses meet with forensic artists (police artist/sketch artist) to describe the face of their assailant. The sketch evidence that’s produced from this interview may be used as probable cause to detain a subject who resembles the sketch. Investigators and forensic art practitioners must understand the process for creating this sketch evidence and strive to enforce best practices that will reduce the probability of misidentification by eyewitnesses.

Seminar Highlights

  • Eyewitness memory issues
  • Minimum 13 sketches completed
  • Identify Sketch Methodologies
  • Reduce Misidentification Issues
  • Advanced Cognitive Interview Principles
  • Processing Sketch Evidence
  • Mindfulness Approach to interview and sketch
  • Drawing Suspect Archetypes
  • Mock interview exercises

Course Outline

Day One

Cognitive Sketch Evidence 1.1

  • Define eyewitness memory
  • How does understanding the function of eyewitness memory assist investigators?
  • Why accuracy is not an option
  • Compare the sketch interview methodologies
  • Standard Methodology–FBI
  • Advanced Methodology–Macrisketch (SJPD, 1976 – 1995)
  • Compositure Methodology–Zamorasketch (SJPD, 1996 – )
  • Discover the issues of eyewitness misidentification
  • Reliability of the eyewitness
  • Interviewing without creating new memories
  • Apply the cognitive interview principles to the sketch interview technique
  • Rapport building; priming the eyewitness for success
  • Narrative format
  • Ask non-leading questions
  • Elaborate on the reliability of cognitive sketch evidence
  • Create leads where there is limited information
  • Formalize the cognitive sketch evidence
  • Scrutinizing the interview process maintains integrity of evidence
  • REQUIRED TESTS (Take home tests; due next class meeting)
  • Complete tests covering issues of memory contamination, and improve the reliability of sketch evidence. The tests will evaluate the following competencies:
  • Eyewitness Memory contamination
  • Distinguish between three methodologies in forensic art
  • List the cognitive interview techniques used for cognitive sketch interviews
  • Predict the reliability of sketch evidence under different sketch methodologies
  • Propose a list of best practices for forensic artists to be used by law enforcement administrators
  • Create a list of best practices for sketch artists to mitigate misidentification

The student will participate in one or more learning activities from proprietary audio/video presentations that demonstrate the Compositure© methodology for cognitive sketch evidence. At a minimum, each activity will address the following topics:

  • Build Rapport
  • Prime the eyewitness
  • Construct a mindful approach to interviewing your eyewitness
  • Elaborate on your mindful approach to the eyewitness narrative
  • Offer an opinion on the reliability of the sketch evidence

Day Two

Cognitive Sketch Evidence 1.2

  • Define eyewitness memory
  • How does understanding the function of eyewitness memory assist investigators?
  • Why accuracy is not an option
  • Compare the sketch interview methodologies
  • Standard Methodology–FBI
  • Advanced Methodology–Macrisketch (SJPD, 1976 – 1995)
  • Compositure Methodology–Zamorasketch (SJPD, 1996 – )
  • Discover the issues of eyewitness misidentification
  • Reliability of the eyewitness
  • Interviewing without creating new memories
  • Apply the cognitive interview principles to the sketch interview technique
  • Rapport building; priming the eyewitness for success
  • Narrative format
  • Ask non-leading questions
  • Elaborate on the reliability of cognitive sketch evidence
  • Create leads where there is limited information
  • Formalize the cognitive sketch evidence
  • Scrutinizing the interview process maintains integrity of evidence
  • REQUIRED TESTS (Take home tests; due next class meeting)
  • Complete tests covering issues of memory contamination, and improve the reliability of sketch evidence. The tests will evaluate the following competencies:
  • Eyewitness Memory contamination
  • Distinguish between three methodologies in forensic art
  • List the cognitive interview techniques used for cognitive sketch interviews
  • Predict the reliability of sketch evidence under different sketch methodologies
  • Propose a list of best practices for forensic artists to be used by law enforcement administrators
  • Create a list of best practices for sketch artists to mitigate misidentification’

The student will participate in one or more learning activities from proprietary audio/video presentations that demonstrate the Compositure© methodology for cognitive sketch evidence. At a minimum, each activity will address the following topics:

  • Build Rapport
  • Prime the eyewitness
  • Construct a mindful approach to interviewing your eyewitness
  • Elaborate on your mindful approach to the eyewitness narrative
  • Offer an opinion on the reliability of the sketch evidence

 

Day Three

Cognitive Sketch Evidence 1.3

  • Choose your wardrobe wisely
  • Mitigating the effects of memory contamination
  • Identify with your role as forensic artist
  • Plan your first impression
  • Utilize mindfulness techniques
  • Focus your attention before you meet your eyewitness
  • Identify the triggers that will put you back on track
  • Build a routine that will prepare you for anything
  • Develop your monologue
  • Organize your main points about the interview process
  • Experiment with different openings and focus on brief rapport building
  • Model your opening with confidence
  • Create the sketch
  • Formulate your strategy for gathering important information
  • Minimize your efforts to look for accuracy and accept the essence of the information
  • Improve your ability to be mindful of the narrative and visualize the culprit’s face
  • Choose to be mindful of active listening techniques
  • Plan to offer the eyewitness opportunities to restate more information without disrupting the flow
  • Combine your ability for empathy with your integrity to gather on the facts
  • Determine the changes suggested by the eyewitness
  • Interpret the validity of the changes by assessing the information gathered from the recollection of the features and the event
  • Measure the likeness of the sketch to the statements made by the eyewitness
  • Decide whether the sketch is reliable or not
  • REQUIRED TESTS (1130 – 1200)
  • Complete tests covering issues of memory contamination, and improve the reliability of sketch evidence. The tests will evaluate the following competencies:
  • Eyewitness Memory contamination
  • Develop a sense for what the eyewitness actually remembers
  • The accuracy of eyewitness memory

The student will participate in one or more learning activities from proprietary audio/video presentations that demonstrate the Compositure© methodology for cognitive sketch evidence. At a minimum, each activity will address the following topics:

  • Construct a mindful approach to interviewing your eyewitness
  • Elaborate on your mindful approach to the eyewitness narrative
  • Discuss the process and what elements were difficult to command

 

 

  • Your instructional style is engaging and your tag-team style is highly effective.

    —George Laing, Fire Prevention Captain, Investigator
  • Your class gave me the confidence and tools to interview the suspect for over 5 hours and to bring a closure to the case.

    —Daniel Phelan, San Jose Police Department
  • I highly recommend this training for any Probation staff who have the necessity to interview/interrogate individuals for investigation purposes.

    —R. Bret Fidler, Santa Clara County Probation Department
  • The information that they have presented is highly relevant to my job, and was presented in a manner that was highly organized and very easy to digest.

    —Michael McGarvey, California State Prison, San Quentin
  • ...Provides useful tools necessary for assessing the veracity of a suspected child abuser, which goes a long way in helping to protect children.

    —Sunny Burgan, MSSW, LCSW, Social Work Supervisor, Santa Clara County DFCS
  • I will continue to use and pass on this information because I really believe in the instructors and their approach.

    —Kimberly Meyer, Washoe County Sheriff's Department
  • This was, by far, one of the most useful classes I've attended since becoming an investigator.

    —Steven Aiello, Antioch Police Department
  • Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to attend the Interview and Interrogation training presented by Paul Francois and Enrique Garcia.

    —Todd Almason, Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office
  • You two are an effective teaching team, and your presentation of the material was consistently interesting, and intelligent without being too intellectualized.

    —Michele Keller, Deputy Probation Officer, County of Alameda
  • Your class has made the greatest and most direct impact on my assignment of any training class that I've taken.

    —Ken Gelskey, National City Police Department

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